Accessible and individualized representation
Published on:

After intense debate and testimony in California, for and against the bill limiting parents’ s rights to refuse vaccinations for their children, the Bill passed.

Now it is up the the governor to either approve or veto the bill.  If approved, all children must be vaccinated (except for medical reasons) or they cannot attend school.   This bill is in contravention to the 1st Amendment right to freedom of religion by effectively forcing families to go against their beliefs in order to offer their children a school-based educational environment.

We will see what the Governor of California will choose.

Published on:

Vaccines-and-Austism
California’s bill to eliminate personal belief exemption for vaccines will move on despite growing dissension. Senate Bill 277 passed California’s Assembly Health Committee 12-6-1 on June 9th and is awaiting another vote within the state assembly. The bill will prevent parents from enrolling their children in school without receiving over forty doses of the ten vaccines deemed “necessary” by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (unless for medical reasons).

The hearing held prior to the Health Committee’s vote attracted concerned parents and doctors from across the state, many delivering testimonies of their experiences with children injured by vaccines. The controversy is rooted in the perpetual struggle between protecting personal liberties and promoting the “greater public good”; with proponents of the bill arguing compulsory vaccinations are necessary to safeguard against a widespread outbreak, while those in opposition are voicing concerns over the safety of vaccines, and others more than concerned about the constitutional violation of  personal liberties.

Somewhat ironically, co-writer of the bill, Senator Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), stated during the hearing that the bill was “about freedom” from disease. Pan was prompted by the December measles “outbreak” in Orange County, Ca. arguing “Vaccines are necessary to protect us. That protection has been eroding.” But not everyone shares his view that California’s health is in dire straits. Santa Monica pediatrician, Jay Gordon asserted that, “Our current measles vaccination rate is easily high enough to prevent school spread” of disease, and statistics seem to be on his side, as only about 140 cases of measles resulted from the outbreak.

Published on:

Widman-Logo-413x337
On May 14, California’s Senate passed Bill 277, that would end a parent’s right to a vaccine exemption for their child due to religious or philosophical reasons, if the bill makes it through the State Assembly. The bill would make California the third state to abolish personal belief exemptions (which include religious or philosophical reasons); following Mississippi and West Virginia; thus requiring all school-age children to receive the vaccines recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The law will require children to be fully vaccinated by seventh grade, allowing families to opt out only for medical reasons, such as allergies to vaccines or other known acquired immune disorders.

The bill, written by Senator Ben Allen (D-Santa Monica) and Senator Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), was prompted by the December measles “outbreak” in Orange County, Ca. Senator Pan believes, “Vaccines are necessary to protect us. That protection has been eroding.” Still, there have been 196 cases of measles across the country this year in 20 states and D.C. and about 70% can be traced to the California emergence, but since March there have been no new cases.

Opposition to this bill exists in California, and to the concept of eradicating personal belief exemptions nation wide. State Senator Bob Huff (R-District 29) voiced his opposition to the bill, not because he does not believe vaccines are effective, all members of his family are vaccinated, but as he puts it, “It comes down to what to we as a society, as a legislature, trade when we mandate that somebody has to do this to protect somebody else.” There is no measles epidemic, and so there is no urgent reason that people must give up personal liberties and be forced to act against religious and philosophical beliefs.

Published on:

Widman-Logo-413x337
This is from:  http://www.vaccination.co.uk/why.htm

“Mandatory vaccination programmes were introduced in the United States in the 1960s; persuasion became obligation as vaccination was a condition of school entry. Vaccination is not mandatory in the UK and consent should always be obtained before immunisations are administered (Downie and Calman 1998).

The UK Department of Health (DOH) recommends that routine vaccines are given as detailed in the immunisation schedule presented by health visitors to all newborns. The DOH has set targets for vaccine uptake.  The aim is that by the age of two, 95 per cent. of children will be immunised against diphtheria, tetanus, polio, pertussis, Hib, measles, mumps and rubella. Similar schedules are in operation throughout the world

Published on:

Widman-Logo-413x337
The Australian Government has announced that the religious exemption for vaccinations is no longer available.  The only exemption left in the Country is the medical exemption.

The Government has tightened the vaccination rules for welfare recipients in Australia and will penalize parents who do not vaccinate, by taking away their childcare benefit and rebate.

Simultaneously, the Government is giving doctors extra money as incentive to keep their patients on the vaccine schedule.

Published on:

Needle-in-arm-413x337
A woman who received the flu shot developed Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS), which left her debilitated and in hospitals for nearly four years.

Sarah Behie filed a claim in the Vaccine Court within the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (“VICP”).  Ms. Behie recently settled the case for $11.6 million, plus another million for lost wages and pain.

The flu shot, in particular, has been causing injuries and illnesses at a high percentage.  Last year, the flu shot dominated the list of vaccine injuries that were compensated.  Of those flu shot injuries, a large percentage were GBS.

Published on:

Widman-Logo-413x337
Yesterday, it was determined that the California Vaccination Exemption Bill would be stalled until next week.   The proposed Bill in California would take away parents’ ability to be exempt from the mandatory vaccination laws,  to which parents must adhere for entry into the school system.

The Bill will be revised in order to reflect changes raised in the Senate Education Committee that took place yesterday.  The hearing will resume in one week after the revisions are made.

There were approximately 600 opponents to the bill  lining the halls of the Capitol.

Published on:

Widman-Logo-413x337
Today,  Governor Christie answered questions regarding his position on mandatory vaccinations. The Governor stated that public health could override parents’ rights to choose to not vaccinate.  However, he mentioned the availability of New Jersey’s “narrowly tailored” vaccine exemption for those who are eligible.

Governor Christie also stated that the state of New Jersey’s vaccine exemption statute could become more stringent and “more narrowly tailored” depending on the outcome of the legislature’s current review.

See the questions and answers in the below link/video.

Contact Information